World’s Tardiest Thank You!

I recently received a hand-written thank-you note for a baby gift I had sent ten years ago. The baby’s father wrote that he had found the old note, dated April 26, 2000, while cleaning out his desk, saying it should have been mailed ten years ago.

He included in his hand-written note the congratulatory note I had sent the family, dated Feb. 14, 2000, saying “it would bring a tear to my eye.”  Indeed it did.  My note read: 

Dear Charles and Beth:

Last night, Darby Wade Grant scored the winning free throws for the 8th grade Girls Basketball Team at MICDS.  What a great game.  I tell you this because when Darby came along, Jim and I enjoyed every second –every stage–every moment.  Any career “high” can never match last night’s game or a thousand other priceless moments.   I am so happy for you both and wish you and the baby good health and much happiness.

Sincerely,

 Pam

Receiving these hand-written notes all these years later was so inspiring.  It was a blessing that everything had been hand-written on stationery and not e-mailed.  It would never have been retrieved when my friend cleaned out his desk.  As an e-mail, it would have been easily deleted and lost forever.  In the Wall Street Journal’s Juggle blog, the “Buy Stamps or Hit Send,” reminded me that as people juggle their busy, daily lives, it’s definitely easier and faster to “hit send.”

Oh, the memories that are lost.  The feel and smell of the Crane paper and the cursive writing cannot be duplicated by e-mail.  It’s unlikely anyone would carry around an e-mail like they do a letter and re-read it.  It’s important not to succumb to technology.  A hand-written note is always more gracious and a more heartfelt expression.

Earlier this year the Wall Street Journal Juggle blog on “Do you Still Send Handwritten Thank-You Notes?” said that Geoffrey Parker, an executive of Parker Pen Company and grandson of the company’s founder, does both.  He phones,   e-mails or uses a text message for an immediate thank you but always follows up with a hand-written message. 
“As these modern electronic devices become more common and overused, they become cheap.” he says.                                                               

If for some reason, you don’t  like your hand-writing, then you can go to salesquill. com and they will write out your notes or letters and send them for you in two days time.  After job interviews, a thank-you-note in writing is recommended.

Don’t let e-mail or social media serve as your way of saying thank you.  Don’t give in to the cold efficiency of technology. Keep the warmth and humanness alive through hand-written correspondence.

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